Selling my books - best way for readers and authors?

Like many authors, I have several ways to get my books into the hands of my adoring fans. Who number in the dozens, I'm sure ;-) 

Libraries and bookstores can order paperback copies wholesale from Ingram Books in the US, or overseas, or from Red Tuque Books here in Canada. Regular customers can order online from Amazon or Chapters/Indigo, or buy a copy direct from me at a book reading or writer's festival. Or if they bump into me on the street or in a pub or cafe, I always have a few copies with me. Of course. Or they can read it via their library. Only the Ottawa one so far, but I'm asking other libraries to order it, and readers can certainly request it on their own. Ditto for finding ebook versions - online, for Kindle, Kobo, iBooks, etc  - with no DRM protection so it can be passed on to others.  Or teh ebook may be in your library too. 

So which is the best way? 

For readers, a face to face purchase means they get a discount, on a signed copy, with a chance to chat with the author. Bookstore or online purchases are more expensive, but more convenient. And the library is both cheap and easy.

For me, the author, online or bookstores are simpler, but - since I have to sell to them wholesale with returns - my profit is much smaller. Face to face, even with a discount, gives me twice the profit, plus a chance to talk to my readers, and remind them to leave a review online somewhere. As for libraries, I get still the small wholesale profit, but the Canada Council of the Arts has a program that compensates authors for having their book in libraries. Plus this increases my readership.

Which is the best for me? Whatever gets my books out there, to be read, reviewed, and recommended to others. 


Some books

It seems a lot of science fiction now is not really that unbelievable.  Kim Stanley Robinson writes  in New York 2140 of a decidedly dampish city. 

"It’s spring in New York City. At Twenty-sixth and Park, the waves shine in the sunlight, and the breeze is briny with seaweed. Morning commuters are boarding a crosstown vaporetto. Out on the canal, finance guys in speedboats weave between the bigger ships. Workers in an inflatable raft are repairing the Flatiron dock; a superintendent, in diving gear, is checking his buildings for leaks. The super-rich live uptown, in a forest of skyscrapers near the Cloisters. The poor live downtown, in Chelsea, which is half-submerged."

If you want something closer to now, you might try Infomocracy by Malka Older.

"Infomocracy is a intellectually stimulating thriller that follows a handful of characters who work for various political parties and election systems. The story hinges on how a voting public receives and interprets information — and how parties manipulate that perception. It’s a book that’s all too relevant in 2016." - the Verge

Or you could always ignore reality and lose yourself in a Lovecraftian murder mystery/satire,  I Am Providence, by Nick Mamatas. 

 


Mapping

Fullsizerender-8We all use maps, paper, online, or mental. Even emotional I suppose. Writers use them for many reasons: to help outline a story, to add to the book as a cool feature, to deal with a bit of ATHD, or just as a way to procrastinate from actual writing.  

Barbara O'Neal has written an interesting article in Writer Unboxed that describes how our minds map to the world around us, using a specific neuron for each location. 

 


About me

    I was born and raised in Kirkland Lake, a small northern mining community with a nearby First Nations reserve.

I grew up with a love of the north, even in the midst of winter, exploring the surrounding woods with my friends, and grandfather. I moved down south in my 20's, to follow a career in quality management, but my real pleasure was still heading outside the city, with canoe and tent. While in Toronto I also developed an interest in back-alley murals, in artistic graffiti, and worked with some police there that saw its potential as a community building exercise.
     I'd always been a voracious reader, so several years into retirement I decided to draw on those high-school years spent hiding in sci-fi and fantasy books and try writing. I haven't stopped since. Kirk's Landing is my first book, released in 2013, and the sequel, Return to Kirk's Landing, was released in December of 2016. While the first two were primarily crime stories, with a bit of supernatural, I have several others waiting to be edited, in the sci-fi and fantasy genres. 

 


Kirk's Landing


Kirks Landing cover (Copy)For a PDF of Chapter One, click here. Comments welcome below.

Synopsis - Dave, an undercover cop, is busted when his cloaking power fails in the middle of a gang meeting. Forced to hide out as Detachment Commander in Kirk's Landing, a small Manitoba town, his only goal is to continue as a loner and lay low for a year. He learns it's hard to stay a loner in a small town, though, especially with everyone eager to meet him and enlist his help with their version of the local issues. In addition to a new and challenging staff, he meets Rosie, the local cafe owner, transplanted from Toronto, Junior, a youth with a spray can and attitude, Mayor Palin, eagerly awaiting new funding for the mill, Chief Bourbeau from the nearby Anishinaabe reserve, waiting to see if Dave will really help, and the chief's daughter, JB, intrigued by this new and handsome Corporal. 

     Dave finds his detective instincts pulling him into an unsolved disappearance, corruption in the local high tech paper mill, and pollution of the local lakes and rivers. Unfortunately, the local council, his boss, even a Federal Minister, all want to keep the issues hushed up. When Dave tries to use his invisibility to help him in his investigations he discovers there are darker forces at work - forces that are now targeting him, changing him. It's now up to his friends to decide if he can be saved in time. 
 
Kirk's Landing is available as a paperback online from Chapters and Amazon, on order from your local bookstore, and as an ebook from Kindle, Kobo, iBooks, etc. 
 
 
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Return to Kirk's Landing  


R2KL front cover only November 26 2016 copyNominated for Ottawa Independent Writers 2017 Frank Hegyi Award and City of Ottawa 2017 Book Awards. Reviewed in the Ottawa Review of Books.

Synopsis - Dave Browne, a former big city undercover cop, is hoping to finally settle into a peaceful new life as police chief in a small northern Canadian town. When he'd first arrived in the middle of winter, he’d relied on both his ability to disappear, and his new First Nations friends, to solve an unsolved murder, expose corruption at the local mill, and defeat an evil spirit. Now it’s summer, and he’s planning on being just a regular cop, worrying about things like jaywalking tourists and loud cottage parties. Unfortunately, parts of his past reappear, and he’s confronted with a biker gang, drugs, another murder, and a demonic possession. It's now time for him to face the benefits and limitations of his unique ability, changing both it and himself in the process.

Return to Kirk's Landing is available as a paperback online from Chapters and Amazon, on order from your local bookstore, and as an ebook from Kindle, Kobo, iBooks, etc.

Note - If you'd like to suggest this title to your local library, here is some information they may need. 

Author: Mike Young
Title: Return to Kirk's Landing
ISBN: 9781928049470
Crime fiction, adult. Paperback, 308 pages
Publisher: Deux Voiliers Publishing (2016)
Price: $22.95 Wholesale/library discounts available
Distributor: Red Tuque Books, Penticton, BC.
Summary - Dave's peaceful new life as police chief in a small town is shattered when ghosts from his past reappear. Suddenly he's confronted with bikers, drugs, treachery, a murder, and the reappearance of an evil spirit.

Finding Kirk's Landing

If you do a Google Maps search, you will find that it's here, at Big Choctaw Bayou on the Tensas River in Louisiana.  Kl

Probably not what you were looking for.

The Kirk's Landing of my book is a fictional town in south east Manitoba. 

As for the book itself, and the sequel they are in several places, including:


Did you like it?

I've sold hundreds of copies of my books face-to-face, plus more online as paperback and ebooks. I've also given away over two dozen, and have copies in local bookstores, the Ottawa Library, and several libraries across Canada. 

So, now that you've read my work, how about an online review?

A few of you have already added your feedback on various sites, but I would appreciate more - be it lavish praise or constructive criticism. You can just add a one-liner, such as "Great read, loved the small town feel, needs less pie and coffee breaks", or more if you feel inspired. Adding it to multiple locations would be even better.

Here are links to some sites:

Thanks, and feel free to pass your copy - paperback or ebook - on to a friend for their enjoyment. And remind them to review of course.